Peter Pan Is A Villain

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You probably know the innocent fairy-tale of Peter Pan where he takes children at night to a land called Neverland where all young one’s dreams come true defeating Captain Hook every step of the way. The story was originally written by James Matthew Barrie in 1904 but through generations, the story has been told differently and twisted to that what was appropriate of that time. But still today, the darkest and subliminal scenes of the fairy-tale have been kept as part of the story, trying to tell us how evil and dark Peter Pan really is. Today I want to prove that Pan is the true villain of the story.

Firstly, Peter Pan stalked a little British girl for quite some time which we get to know and love her as Wendy, (who is one of the main characters of this horrific fairy-tale story). In the very opening of the tale, we find Peter and his small fairy friend, Tinkerbelle searching for Pan’s shadow in Wendy’s house. We can only expect that his shadow escaped as he was disgusted by Peter Pan’s violations against mankind. So, the shadow decided in a frantic opportunity of freedom to flee the clutches of Pan. Sadly, Peter Pan misguided poor, confused Wendy into thinking she was doing the right thing by helping pan recover his shadow and stitching the harmless creature to his feet, to prevent it from ever getting away. He at that point uncovered that he already knew their names, their family, their usual whereabouts, and their daily activities/ routines. Watching someone without the person’s knowledge and consent for a lengthy period of time and knowing their usual activities is the exact definition of the word stalking and is not an action performed by a normal, good person who is labeled as a hero in a fairy-tale. Why do we let children look up to this so-called heroic character if you can honestly list his name, Peter Pan under the category of fairy-tale villains?

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A second key reason why Peter Pan is the Villain is that he abducts young, little children for amusement. Once Pan and Tinkerbelle finally finished introducing each other to Wendy and her two brothers, Pan forcibly grasped Tinkerbelle forcing her to enable the kids to fly. Then he asked his newest targets to fly away with him to a mysterious land called Neverland, made for children, without their carer’s agreement or even waiting for a response before taking off. If you think about it, this is just a magical form of a disturbing man tempting little children into his car with possibilities of receiving a huge surprise like sweets or toys but instead leads them to their doom. Obviously, if the children have only known Peter Pan for not even a minute and get convinced to be taken away to a strange place, there must be bad intentions involving them. This part of the story is just teaching children to trust strangers who ask them to go somewhere with them. In most cases, this is how little young ones go missing. That’s why parents should know that Pan is pure evil and be there to explain to their children that trusting strangers is never the right thing to do. And should always be taken with caution as you don’t know their intentions.

Another key reason why Pan is the villain is that he is a greedy power addict. The lost boys are a big question mark, little is known about them except that they have been Pan’s companions for a very long time. All of the boys wear bizarre costumes of animals like squirrels, raccoons, foxes, and skunks. Much more noticeably different from Pan’s own garments, a small probable sign of cultish activity. As he wears something different from the boys it shows that he is the leader of the group and his ‘friends’ all wear similar costumes which may indicate that they are Pans, little minions, or workers, as they are wearing uniforms. Evidence for this cultish activity is that once the British children were presented to the lost boys, they instantly tried to teach them lines to what obviously sounds like a cultish chant/ ritual. The main lyrics of the chant were ‘Were following the leader’. Through analyzing the story, we find that Peter Pan is the leader of the lost boys and since the enchanted land of Neverland grants immortality, meaning that there will on no occasion ever be an alternative leader besides Peter Pan. Peter Pan tries to control every single action of the children, not caring about their opinions or wants, like the way he asked if Wendy and her siblings wanted to go somewhere magical but didn’t even wait for a response before flying off.

My fourth and final reason why Peter Pan is the Villain is that he is a sociopathic torturer. At the end of the story, Peter Pan sits down on some logs with Wendy and the lost boys. He starts telling them stories including one which was about how he removed Captain Hooks’ hand and tossed it to a crocodile. Pan not only did such a dreadful, sinful thing to a person; he obviously loved removing Hook’s hand, by the way, he glorified the story and even managed to somehow get the children to cheer about these actions. Captain Hook is pictured as the villain but only acts like that because he wants revenge for all the pain and grief Pan has caused him for cutting his hand. Pan does not have any excuse for all the evil things he’s done and, somehow finds enjoyment from his actions.

In conclusion, it’s clear that there are many arguments on why Peter Pan should be listed as the Villain of the story. We have examined Peter Pan’s worrying stalk-ish behavior, his enjoyment of kidnapping children, his addiction to power and his similar traits of a sociopathic torturer. Listing Peter Pan as a hero is huge error humanity has overlooked and from now on should start acknowledging this serious matter to make a safer environment for the future generations of children to come.

Sources:

Google.com, Vox.com, Britannica.com, Wikipedia.com, 

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